Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
vpf:co-simulation [2018-01-11 14:39]
stian
vpf:co-simulation [2018-01-11 14:41] (current)
stian
Line 31: Line 31:
   * The interface to each subsimulator can be minimal and opaque, simply consisting of transfer of input and output values. This allows the models to be "black boxes" where the implementation details can be well hidden, which is often desirable in an industrial setting.   * The interface to each subsimulator can be minimal and opaque, simply consisting of transfer of input and output values. This allows the models to be "black boxes" where the implementation details can be well hidden, which is often desirable in an industrial setting.
   * It typically represents a very loose coupling between the subsystems, both in the physical sense and in the software-architectural sense. This allows for a great degree of encapsulation,​ which makes it easier to reuse models in other contexts later, as they will have minimal dependencies on other subsystems.   * It typically represents a very loose coupling between the subsystems, both in the physical sense and in the software-architectural sense. This allows for a great degree of encapsulation,​ which makes it easier to reuse models in other contexts later, as they will have minimal dependencies on other subsystems.
-  * The loose coupling and comparatively large macro step length makes it very well suited for [[#​distributed_simulation|distributed simulations]],​ where the workload can be spread over multiple CPU cores, or even multiple machines in a network. The latter case opens up possibilities to run cross-platform simulations,​ which may be required in order to combine certain simulation tools. A few case studies relevant for marine applications using co-simulations are discussed in  +  * The loose coupling and comparatively large macro step length makes it very well suited for [[#​distributed_simulation|distributed simulations]],​ where the workload can be spread over multiple CPU cores, or even multiple machines in a network. The latter case opens up possibilities to run cross-platform simulations,​ which may be required in order to combine certain simulation tools. A few case studies relevant for marine applications using co-simulations are discussed in [(cite:​SkjongVirtual>>​
-[(cite:​SkjongVirtual>>​+
   | authors = Skjong, S. et al.   | authors = Skjong, S. et al.
   | title   = Virtual prototyping of maritime systems and operations: applications of distributed co-simulations  ​   | title   = Virtual prototyping of maritime systems and operations: applications of distributed co-simulations  ​
  • vpf/co-simulation.txt
  • Last modified: 2018-01-11 14:41
  • by stian