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vpf:coupling_conventions [2017-02-12 20:30]
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vpf:coupling_conventions [2017-02-12 20:31] (current)
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 A power bond between two subsystems A and B consists of two variable couplings, where one represents an //effort//, and the other represents a //flow//. For an electrical connection, for example, the effort is the electromotive force (i.e., voltage) while the flow is the current. The two couplings are oppositely directed, meaning that if A has effort as an output variable, then it has flow as an input variable, while they must be the other way around for B. This is illustrated in the figure on the right. A power bond between two subsystems A and B consists of two variable couplings, where one represents an //effort//, and the other represents a //flow//. For an electrical connection, for example, the effort is the electromotive force (i.e., voltage) while the flow is the current. The two couplings are oppositely directed, meaning that if A has effort as an output variable, then it has flow as an input variable, while they must be the other way around for B. This is illustrated in the figure on the right.
  
-Normally, the product of an effort and a flow has units of //power// (watt) and is a direct measure of the power that is transferred between the two subsystems. This makes it very easy to keep track of the energy flow through the system, to see where energy is produced and dissipated, and to locate violations of energy conservation. (If nothing else, this can be useful for debugging model code.) This feature is employed to good effect in the [[:​co-simulation_algorithms#​ecco|ECCO]] method.+Normally, the product of an effort and a flow has units of //power// (watt) and is a direct measure of the power that is transferred between the two subsystems. This makes it very easy to keep track of the energy flow through the system, to see where energy is produced and dissipated, and to locate violations of energy conservation. (If nothing else, this can be useful for debugging model code.) This feature is employed to good effect in the [[ECCO]] method.
  
 The following table shows the standard definitions and units for different energy domains: The following table shows the standard definitions and units for different energy domains:
  • vpf/coupling_conventions.txt
  • Last modified: 2017-02-12 20:31
  • by lars